Abstract

In Alzheimer’s disease (AD), blood biomarkers have become an attractive, scalable tool for use in clinical evaluation, trial selection, and disease monitoring. Hyperphosphorylated tau (pTau) is a specific blood biomarker for AD pathology, with pTau217 considered to have the most utility. However, availability of pTau217 tests for research and clinical use has been limited. Expanding access to this highly accurate AD biomarker is crucial for wider evaluation and implementation of AD blood tests that could enable earlier diagnosis and disease intervention.

Join our speakers as they present clinical evaluation data for ALZpath’s plasma pTau217 assay showing:

  1. The results obtained from Wisconsin's Registry for Alzheimer's Prevention (WRAP) in relation to pTau217 and the practical aspects of high-throughput sample analysis.
  2. pTau217's superior solo performance compared to the pTau217/non-pTau212-221 ratio.
  3. The advancements in developing an easy-to-use, highly accurate blood-based AD test.

These results demonstrate the high-performance of the ALZpath plasma pTau217 assay for identification of biological AD. The wider availability of high-performing assays will expedite the use of blood biomarkers in clinical settings and benefit the research community.

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Speakers

Henrik Zetterberg, PhD.

Henrik Zetterberg, PhD.

Professor of Neurochemistry at The University of Gothenburg, Sweden, and University College London, UK, and a Clinical Chemist at Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Gothenburg, Sweden.

Henrik Zetterberg is a Professor of Neurochemistry at The University of Gothenburg, Sweden, and University College London, UK, and a Clinical Chemist at Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Gothenburg, Sweden. He is Head of the Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry at the University of Gothenburg, leads the UK DRI Fluid Biomarker Laboratory at UCL, and is a Key  Member of the Hong Kong Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases and a Visiting Professor in the UW Department of Medicine, School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin. His main research focus and clinical interest are fluid biomarkers for brain diseases, neurodegenerative diseases in particular.

Kaj Blennow, PhD.

Kaj Blennow, PhD.

Professor in Clinical Neurochemistry at University of Gothenburg, and Head of the Clinical Neurochemistry Lab at Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.

Kaj Blennow is Professor in Clinical Neurochemistry at University of Gothenburg, and Head of the Clinical Neurochemistry Lab at Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. He holds a Specialist Competence in Psychiatry and in Clinical Chemistry. His main research interest is the development of new analytical methods for CSF and blood biomarkers for AD and other brain disorders, and the application of these to increase the understanding of AD pathophysiology, as well as for screening, diagnostics and for therapy monitoring in clinical trials. Dr. Blennow is President of the Society for CSF analysis and Clinical Neurochemistry and head of the Alzheimer’s Association QC program for CSF and blood biomarkers.

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